SOMETHING FOR THE "STRAIGHTS"

How to give the illusion of a waist when you don't have one.

This article is not for curvies who fear their waist has gone.  It hasn't!  This is for people who have a naturally straight shape and never had a clearly defined waist even when they carried not an ounce of extra weight.  It is inspired by my visit to Kensington Palace and the exhibition of some dresses from Princess Diana's wardrobe.  At 5' 10.5" she was tall and slim and did not have a pronounced waist.  It was fascinating to see how her designers - from the Emanuels to Catherine Walker - gave her the illusion of a waist.  With dresses they used anything from ruching, empire line (a seam under the bust) with a lighter colour on top and darker underneath, an asymmetric waist - i.e. falling to a point at the side, a drop waist (her wedding dress) or a fitted shift (princess line!) shown in the image for the exhibition Diana - Her Fashion Story.  (NB the wide neckline.)  In suits, her jackets often were often fitted to the top of the hips and with straight skirts.  The wide 1980's shoulders helped in her early days too.  To sum up, the interest was around the bust/shoulder line and/or the hips.  She avoided obviously waisted clothes and dresses or skirts gathered at the waist. 

If you have a straight body, you too can give the illusion of a waist with these ideas.  Fashions may have changed but the basic style ideas remain the same.  Of course, you may not be bothered about suggesting you have a waist and if you are a real straight, you will look good in shifts and shirt dresses which fall - you've guessed it - straight!

 

The drop waist and interest at the shoulders

The drop waist and interest at the shoulders

The Asymmetrical waist

The Asymmetrical waist

Interest at the shoulders; fitted to below the waist; straight skirt in a different fabric.   

Interest at the shoulders; fitted to below the waist; straight skirt in a different fabric.